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Annual Reports

2001New and Revised UC IPM Publications

Contents
The UC Interactive Tutorial for Biological Control of Insects and Mites
Integrated Pest Management for Almonds,
2nd edition
Reducing Pesticide Risks
Pesticide and Water Quality Web Site

An Interactive Tutorial for the Identification of Ants
Pest Notes Address Hot Topics
PDF Versions of Pest Notes Now Available on UC IPM Web Site

For ordering information, access the UC IPM "how-to-order" page or order online from the Division of Agricultural and Natural Resources (ANR) catalog.


The UC Interactive Tutorial for Biological Control of Insects and Mites

Students, professionals, growers, and master gardeners will benefit from the new interactive CD-ROM released in fall, 2001. Available for Windows computers, the UC Interactive Tutorial for Biological Control of Insects and Mites is the perfect teaching tool for anyone interested in learning more about biological control.

With more than 60 beneficial species covered on 75 narrated screens, this tutorial teaches users to recognize signs of parasitism and predation, identify specific natural enemies of common pests, and understand the biology of several predators, parasites, and pathogens. The CD provides instruction on releasing commercially available biological control agents such as insects, mites, and nematodes. Information on integrating the use of pesticides and other management practices with biological control is also included. Twenty-four interactive games and quizzes, including multiple-choice, matching, or "complete-the-diagram" questions, enhance learning.

Authored by Mary Louise Flint and Cheryl Reynolds, this CD contains 350 beautiful color photographs, more than 20 detailed illustrations, and a comprehensive index for easy navigation.

Integrated Pest Management for Almonds,

2nd edition

Integrated Pest Management for Almonds, first published in 1986, has been revised and expanded. About 40 pages longer, the second edition includes almost 50 new color photos and line drawings. Chapters on vegetation management and vertebrate pests have been extensively revised, as well as the sections on navel orangeworm and peach twig borer. Ten new pests have been added.

The second edition of IPM for Almonds emphasizes management techniques that eliminate the use of broad-spectrum insecticide sprays. Featured practices include sanitation and early harvest to minimize navel orangeworm damage, bloomtime sprays of Bacillus thuringiensis and pheromone mating disruption to control peach twig borer, timely oil sprays and reliance on biological control for San Jose scale, and baiting and rapid nut pickup to control damage by ants.

Originally written by Barbara Ohlendorf, the second edition was revised by Larry Strand with contributions from 45 University of California researchers, Cooperative Extension specialists and farm advisors. The book's chapters explain how to identify, manage, and prevent biotic and abiotic diseases, insects and mites, nematodes, weeds, and vertebrate pests. The second edition, published in January 2002, contains a total of 259 photos and 79 line drawings and tables.

Reducing Pesticide Risks

The Pesticide Safety Education Program released two interactive video tools for use by people who train pesticide handlers and agricultural fieldworkers under the requirements of the federal Worker Protection Standard. These videos, which emphasize pesticide risk reduction, were produced through funding from the United States Department of Agriculture.

Each video comes with a companion manual (available in PDF) that instructs trainers to stop the video after each scene and engage trainees in interactive exercises designed to verify and solidify trainees' understanding of the material. Interactive activities provided in the manuals include the use of drawings, discussions, role-play, hands-on exercises, games, and case studies.

The pesticide handler video portrays a five-episode story about a farm owner and a recently hired employee, showing their discussions on pesticide illnesses and injuries, how to protect yourself when you handle pesticides, how to safely handle pesticides and their containers, how to apply pesticides safely, and how to clean up after handling pesticides. The 113-page instructor's manual, Reducing Pesticide Risks: An Interactive Program for Training Pesticide Handlers (PDF 2782K), is used with this interactive training program.

The agricultural fieldworker video uses six separate scenarios to cover first aid and medical help for pesticide exposure, hazards of drinking and eating while working in the field, common routes of pesticide exposure, restricted-entry intervals, avoiding exposure to pesticide residues in the field, and keeping pesticides out of the home. The last chapter of the fieldworker manual provides quiz games to reinforce what trainees have heard and seen in the video. The 91-page instructor's manual, WPS Training for Fieldworkers: Teaching Workers How to Protect Themselves from Pesticide Hazards in the Workplace (PDF 886K), is used with this interactive training program.

The video script was written by Melanie Zavala and Jennifer Weber, and the video was directed and produced by Jennifer Weber.

Pesticide and Water Quality Web Site

The UC Statewide IPM Project is actively involved in developing material to educate agricultural and urban audiences on issues related to the use of the insecticides diazinon and chlorpyrifos and their contamination of local creeks and rivers. As part of this outreach effort, a Pesticide and Water Quality section was added to the UC IPM Web site in August 2001.

Based on information compiled by former UC IPM staff member Jodi Azulai for the Sacramento Master Gardener program, the new residential water quality Web pages were developed to address the problem of diazinon and chlorpyrifos being detected in local waterways at levels that threaten aquatic invertebrates. The site provides detailed information on how these and other pesticides enter waterways through storm drains and how even small amounts can disrupt the entire food pyramid. Links to pages on proper use, storage, and disposal of pesticides are included as well as a page on what to look for on a pesticide label. Alternatives to pesticides are emphasized. This site was demonstrated to over 50 Master Gardeners, Cooperative Extension advisors, and specialists at the Urban Horticulture Workgroup meeting in May 2001, and to various public agency representatives in July. The pages were developed by Cheryl Reynolds with assistance from Mary Louise Flint and Joyce Strand.

Also included in the Pesticides and Water Quality section are research results and extension information related to agriculture pest management, developed under State Water Resources Control Board and CALFED grants led by Frank Zalom.

An Interactive Tutorial for the Identification of Ants

Argentine ants, carpenter ants, odorous house ants, pavement ants, pharaoh ants, red imported fire ants, southern fire ants, and thief ants have been identified as the most common ant species found around California homes and structures. A new key to identifying these eight species has been linked to the Ants Pest Note under Home and Landscape Pests on the UC IPM Web site. Users can easily navigate through the key by reading descriptions and clicking on detailed illustrations. Summary pages for each ant species are included with information on key identifying characteristics, behavior, and nest type. Quick management tips are presented for each species; these give an overall strategy for eliminating infestations and provide some pointers for preventing future invasions. Management recommendations focus on the least-toxic control options available with an emphasis on baiting for most species. The tutorial contains some general information on ant identification, anatomy, and biology. Matching, multiple-choice, and "complete-the-diagram"-type exercises are included to reinforce some of the information presented.

The program was developed by Cheryl Reynolds with assistance from Mary Louise Flint and Joyce Strand. Major contributors of this project included John Klotz and Mike Rust from the Department of Entomology at UC Riverside, Phil Ward from the Department of Entomology at UC Davis, and Fresno County UC Cooperative Extension Farm Advisor Rich Coviello.

Pest Notes Address Hot Topics

When pests plague Californians, there is the UC IPM Pest Note series to turn to. This year new Pest Notes were released for several of the new exotic pests plaguing Californians including the red imported fire ant (pictured), glassy-winged sharpshooter, and sudden oak death. Other notes address age-old problems such as ant invasions, getting cockroaches out of the home, outbreaks of head lice, house mice infestations, powdery mildew in the garden, and dealing with poison oak.

Pest Notes provide Californians with current information on how to manage their pest problems using a variety of methods, including how to prevent pest invasions, how to create an unfavorable environment for the pest, whether or not effective biological control agents are available for the pest, and what are the most effective least-toxic control materials available to control the pest.

Pest Notes are free to the public and available as handouts from county Cooperative Extension offices or by computer online. The online version of the Pest Note is illustrated with award-winning, beautiful, close-up photographs that help the user correctly identify the problem. Currently there are nearly 100 Pest Notes in the series with new ones being written in response to requests from master gardeners, farm advisors, and the public for more information on hot pest problems that plague Californians.

PDF Versions of Pest Notes Now Available on UC IPM Web Site

New PDF files make printing pest management guidelines for home and landscapes easier. As the home and landscape guidelines are updated and new ones issued, the PDF file is linked to the Web page for a specific pest. Although the PDF versions contain only line drawings, text is identical to the Web pages. In August 2001, PDFs for 29 pests were available.

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Statewide IPM Program, Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California
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