UC IPM Online UC ANR home page UC IPM home page

UC IPM Home

SKIP navigation

 

Annual Reports

2004Competitive Grants Programs

Summaries of research projects are online. Funded projects (below) are linked to the summaries.

UC IPM Competitive Grants Program

Two years of budget cuts to UC IPM, totaling almost $500,000, have drastically reduced the amount of funds available for new research grants. However, UC IPM officials have released a request for proposals for new projects for 2005-06.

In 2004-05, continuing projects exhausted most of the available funds, but the program was able to fund one year of four of the projects that had been approved, but not funded, for 2003-04.

Mike Rust, Entomology, UC Riverside, stepped down as Associate Director for Research in 2003. This position has not been refilled, and for now will continue to be vacant since the UC IPM grants program has been significantly reduced. If the grants program can be rebuilt, an associate director for research will be appointed.

New Projects for 2004-2005

Biological Controls
Evaluation of biological control of the redgum lerp psyllid, Glycaspis brimblecombei Moore, on Eucalyptus camldulensis in California. T. Paine, Entomology, UC Riverside; K. Daane, ESPM, Insect Biology, UC Berkeley. (Year 1 of 1)

Cultural Controls
Combining a plant canopy airflow system, plastic mulch, and optimum crop density to manage Botrytis cinerea on Lisianthus. S. N. Wegulo, Plant Pathology, UC Riverside; S. A. Tjosvold, UC Coop. Ext. Santa Cruz Co.; J. F. Thompson, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, UC Davis. (Year 1 of 1)

Stand establishment and tillage alternatives to reduce weed seedbanks and herbicide use in rice. A. J. Fischer, Vegetable Crops, UC Davis; J. E. Hill, Agronomy and Range Science, UC Davis. (Year 1 of 1)

Decision Support
Development and validation of sampling plans for pests of Gerbera jamsonii. M. P. Parella, Entomology, UC Davis; R. Y. Evans, Environmental Horticulture, UC Davis; J. P. Newman, UC Coop. Ext. Ventura Co.; S. A. Tjosvold, UC Coop. Ext. Santa Cruz Co.; K. L. Robb, UC Coop. Ext. San Diego Co. (Year 1 of 1)

Continuing Research Projects Funded for 2004-2005

All currently funded projects are in their last year of funding. These projects and those that ended in July 2004 are listed here. View the UC IPM Web site for summaries of all research projects funded by the UC IPM Grants Program.

Biological Controls
Improved biological control of fire blight of pear and apple by introduction of antagonistic bacteria into unopened flowers. S. E. Lindow, Plant and Microbial Biology, UC Berkeley. (Year 3 of 3; $30,300)

Biorational Use of Biotic Agents
Control of the olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae, through postharvest fruit sanitation and spinosad baits (GF-120). R. A. Van Steenwyk, Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, UC Berkeley. (Year 3 of 3; $26,151)

Cultural Controls
Cultural manipulation of crop/weed competitive relations in a rice cropping system. A. J. Fischer, Vegetable Crops, UC Davis. (Year 3 of 3; $34,168)

Implementation value of root-galling resistance and reproduction resistance for root knot nematode management in dry beans. P. A. Roberts, Nematology, UC Riverside. (Year 3 of 3; $33,984)

Integrated management of perennial pepperweed, Lepidium latifolium. R. G. Wilson, UC Coop. Ext. Lassen Co.; J. M. DiTomaso, Vegetable Crops, UC Davis. (Year 3 of 3; $24,705)

Decision Support
Development and application of a PCR-based detection method for predicting the incidence of beet curly top virus in leafhoppers and in tomato crops. R. L. Gilbertson, Plant Pathology, UC Davis. (Year 3 of 3; $24,000)

Decision support system for IPM of prune brown rot. T. J. Michailides, Kearney Agricultural Center, Parlier. (Year 3 of 3; $36,290)

Development of an economic injury level and monitoring methods for cottony cushion scale, Icerya purchasi, and the predatory beetle vedalia beetle Rodolia cardinalis. E. E. Grafton-Cardwell, Entomology, UC Riverside/Kearney Agricultural Center, Parlier; J. T. Trumble, Entomology, UC Riverside. (Year 3 of 3; $40,721)

Research that Ended in 2004

Biological Controls
The fungus, Hirsutella thompsonii, for the biological control of the Varroa mite, a pest of honeybees. C. S. Peng, Entomology, UC Davis; H. K. Kaya, Nematology, UC Davis; E. C. Mussen, Entomology, UC Davis.

Cultural Control
Broccoli residue as a biofumigant for cyst nematode management in cole crops. B. B. Westerdahl, Nematology, UC Davis; E. P. Caswell-Chen, Nematology, UC Davis.

Decision Support
Northern fowl mite effects on egg production and feed utilization efficiency. B. A. Mullens, Entomology, UC Riverside; D. R. Kuney, UC Coop. Ext. Riverside Co.

California ground squirrel (Spermophilus beecheyi) foraging behavior: Implications for improved control. T. P. Salmon, Wildlife, Fisheries and Conservation Biology, UC Davis.

Applied Field Ecology
A new look at an old pest: what makes Lygus hungry for cotton squares? J. A. Rosenheim, Entomology, UC Davis.

Biology and overwintering of the corn leafhopper, Dalbulus maidis, and corn stunt spiroplasm, Spiroplasma kunkelii, and epidemiology of corn stunt disease in the San Joaquin Valley. C. G. Summers, Entomology, UC Davis/Kearney Agricultural Center/Parlier.

Effects of plant age at the time of root knot nematode, Meloidogyne javanica, infection on yields. A.T. Ploeg, Nematology, UC Riverside.

Biorational Use of Biotic Agents

Bait development for ant control in vineyards. J. H. Klotz, Entomology, UC Riverside.

UC IPM Grants Technical Committee 2004-2005

New members to be selected Winter 2005.

Exotic/Invasive Pests and Diseases Research Program

Summaries of research projects are online. Funded projects (below) are linked to the summaries.

The UC Exotic/Invasive Pests and Diseases Research Program (EPDRP) is funded through a Special Research Grant provided through USDA-CSREES. The review committees approved $1.7 million in funding for 23 new projects from the 2004-2007 USDA grant. This brings the number of projects sponsored by the program to 65, for almost $6 million.

The third annual research workshop sponsored by Exotic/Invasive Pests and Diseases Research Program was held at Emeryville, California, Oct. 13 and 14, 2004. Earlier this year, the program co-sponsored the Glassy-winged Sharpshooter Conference in Napa.

Established in 2001, the UC Exotic/Invasive Pests and Diseases Research Program is a joint program of the UC Riverside Center for Invasive Species Research and UC IPM. The program, which targets research on exotic pests and diseases/invasive species important to California, aims not only to improve our knowledge of pests that are already in California, but also to get a head start on pests that pose a likely threat to the state.

Additional funds are being sought to extend the program and, if successful, the EPDRP will request new proposals late Winter 2005. For more information about the program and the projects it sponsors, see the UC IPM Web site.

New Projects Funded for 2004-2007

Agricultural Systems
Evaluation of olive-associated yeast as an attractant for olive fruit fly. K. L. Boundy-Mills, Food Science and Technology, UC Davis; F. G. Zalom, Entomology, UC Davis. (1 year, $17,920)

An educational program for California concerning the identification and damage potential of Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri. E. E. Grafton-Cardwell, Entomology, UC Riverside; K. E. Godfrey, CDFA Biocontrol Program; M. E. Rogers, Entomology, University of Florida; C. C. Childers, University of Florida; P. A. Stansly, University of Florida. (2 years, $21,000)

Use of ginger root oil to enhance the mating competitiveness of mass-reared males of the Mediterranean fruit fly: Development of an effective exposure protocol. T. E. Shelly, USDA-APHIS. (1 year, $14,006)

Invasive citrus peelminer populations in California: Home grown or invasion from Mexico? R. Stouthamer, Entomology, UC Riverside; D. Vickerman, Entomology, UC Riverside. (1 year, $39,164)

Gene chips to detect and prevent establishment of Citrus tristeza virus isolates. D. E. Ullman, Entomology, UC Davis; B. W. Falk, Plant Pathology, UC Davis. (1 year, $50,000)

Fate of vine mealybug on winery waste. L. G. Varela, UC Coop. Ext. Sonoma Co.; R. J. Smith, UC Coop. Ext. Sonoma Co. (1 year, $17,500)

Using molecular markers to identify origins and trace spread of herbicide resistance in Echinochloa oryzoides and E. phyllopogon infesting rice fields in California. M. A. Jasieniuk, Vegetable Crops, UC Davis; A. J. Fischer, Vegetable Crops, UC Davis. (3 years, $118,379)

Developing an Argentine ant baiting program for organic agriculture. J. H. Klotz, Entomology, UC Riverside; M. K. Rust, Entomology, UC Riverside. (2 years, $56,097)

Hyperparasitoids and predators, two potential biotic factors disrupting the biological control of the walnut aphid in California. N. J. Mills, Insect Biology, UC Berkeley. (3 years, $94,088)

Natural Systems
Invasive annuals in the Mojave Desert: Interactions of nitrogen deposition and soil type. E. B. Allen, Botany and Plant Sciences, UC Riverside. (3 years, $115,416)

The establishment of pitch canker in the Sierra Nevada. T. R. Gordon, Plant Pathology, UC Davis. (3 years, $110,392)

Physiological basis for invasiveness of Sahara mustard, Brassica tournefortii, in Southwestern deserts. J. S. Holt, Botany and Plant Sciences, UC Riverside. (3 years, $123,730)

Development of a ranked inventory of invasive plants that threaten wildlands. J. A. Randall, The Nature Conservancy; J. M. DiTomaso, Vegetable Crops, UC Davis. (2 years, $32,950)

Ecological influences on invasion success of introduced genes in California tiger salamanders. H. B. Shaffer, Evolution and Ecology, UC Davis. (2 years, $118,200)

Ecological and economic risk assessment and expansion dynamics of wild pigs in oak woodland ecosystems in California. R. A. Sweitzer, Biology, University of North Dakota; R. E. Loggins, Biology, University of North Dakota. (3 years, $139,441)

New relationships among the sudden oak death pathogen, native bark and ambrosia beetles, and decay fungi colonizing North American oaks. D. L. Wood, Insect Biology, UC Berkeley. (3 years, $144,973)

Determination of the biology and methods for monitoring and treatment of the Asian woolly hackberry aphid, Shivaphis celti, in California. A. B. Lawson, Entomology, California State University, Fresno; P. M. Geisel, UC Coop. Ext. Fresno Co. (2 years, $70,233)

Urban Systems
Invasive species introduction on eucalyptus: Is there a pattern? T. D. Paine, Entomology, UC Riverside. (1 year, $68,265)

Studies on flight behavior of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. M. K. Rust, Entomology, UC Riverside; L. Greenberg, Entomology, UC Riverside. (1 year, $39,327)

Determining tumbleweed, Salsola, species and hybrids in California. D. R. Strong, Evolution and Ecology, UC Davis. (1 year, $44,341)

Assessing the vulnerability of forests to exotic pathogens through analysis of tree ring patterns. J. J. Battles, Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, UC Berkeley. (2 years, $84,679)

Applied ecology and management of Eurasian watermilfoil, Myriophyllum spicatum, in Fall River. J. M. DiTomaso, Vegetable Crops, UC Davis; D. F. Spencer, Vegetable Crops, UC Davis. (3 years, $92,040)

Developing pheromone-based detection methods for exotic cerambycid beetles. J. G. Millar, Entomology, UC Riverside. (3 years, $157,141)

Continuing Projects Funded for 2002-2005

Agricultural Systems
Predicting and controlling building infestations of the pest ant, Linepithema humile, by urban landscaping. P. Nonacs, Ecology and Evolution, UC Los Angeles; J. H. Klotz, Entomology, UC Riverside.

Natural Systems
Updating integrated pest management systems for pitch canker: Known and potential insect vectors. D. L. Wood, Insect Biology, UC Berkeley.

Impacts and control of an invasive seaweed in California marine protected areas. J. H. R. Goddard, Marine Science Institute, UC Santa Barbara; C. A. Blanchette, Marine Science Institute, UC Santa Barbara.

Managing the impacts of the European green crab, Carcinus maenas, in coastal estuaries. E. Grosholz, Environmental Science and Policy, UC Davis.

Impacts and control of giant reed, Arundo donax, in riparian habitats. J. S. Holt, Botany and Plant Sciences, UC Riverside.

Intensive grazing practices and revegetation for controlling medusahead in California grasslands. E. A. Laca, Agronomy and Range Science, UC Davis; M. R. George, Agronomy and Range Science, UC Davis; J. M. DiTomaso, Vegetable Crops, UC Davis.

Burning of medusahead, an exotic annual grass

Researcher Finds Solutions to Reduce Medusahead

Medusahead is an exotic annual grass that poses one of the greatest threats to rangeland production and wildland plant diversity in California.

Research by Joe DiTomaso shows that prescribed burning in late spring or early summer, before seed drop, is a very effective treatment. The combination of a summer burn (which removed the thatch) followed by a fall herbicide treatment provides 100 percent control. Experiments also indicate that removing the thatch by either tillage, burning, or mowing reduces the competitiveness of medusahead by 50 percent or more.

Urban Systems
Biological control of the spotted gum psyllid, Eucalyptolyma maidenii: A new pest on urban eucalyptus. T. D. Paine, Entomology, UC Riverside.

Genetic selection and behavior modification to circumvent differential susceptibility of eucalyptus longhorned borers to attack by the egg parasitoid, Avetianella longoi. J. G. Millar, Entomology, UC Riverside; T. D. Paine, Entomology, UC Riverside.

Distribution and control of an exotic pest wasp, the German yellowjacket, Vespula germanica, in southern California. P. K. Visscher, Entomology, UC Riverside.

Continuing Projects Funded for 2003-2006

Agricultural Systems
Identification of the parasitoid fauna associated with California sharpshooters and host specificity testing of exotic mymarid parasitoids released for classical biological control of glassy-winged sharpshooter. M. S. Hoddle, Entomology, UC Riverside.

Control of curly top virus using trap crops and repellents against the vector, beet leafhopper. G. P. Walker, Entomology, UC Riverside.

Development of mimetic insecticidal peptides for glassy-winged sharpshooter control. B. Federici, Entomology, UC Riverside.

Evaluation of the role of arthropods in the persistence and dispersal of exotic Newcastle disease (END) in southern California. A. C. Gerry, Entomology, UC Riverside; C. J. Cardona, School of Veterinary Medicine, UC Davis.

Using population structure to identify effective parasitoid biotypes for biological control of mealy plum aphid, Hyalopterus pruni, in California. N. J. Mills, Insect Biology, UC Berkeley.

Origins, thresholds, and management of the tomato psyllid in California. J. T. Trumble, Entomology, UC Riverside; R. Stouthamer, Entomology, UC Riverside.

Functional use of geographic information systems to model the range and abundance of vine mealybug and its natural enemies. A. P. Gutierrez, Ecosystem Sciences, UC Berkeley; K. M. Daane, Insect Biology, UC Berkeley.

Natural Systems
Controlling establishing infestations of herbaceous perennials in the Lake Tahoe Basin. M. Renz, Extension Plant Sciences, New Mexico State University; W. E. Frost, UC Coop. Ext. El Dorado Co.

Genetic and reproductive factors contributing to the invasiveness of Cortaderia jubata and C. elloana in California. M. A. Jasieniuk, Vegetable Crops, UC Davis; J. M. DiTomaso, Vegetable Crops, UC Davis.

Sabellid polychaete detection in native gastropod populations and control at abalone culture facilities. E. D. Grosholz, Environmental Science and Policy, UC Davis; J. Moore, School of Veterinary Medicine, Medicine, and Epidemiology, UC Davis.

Disease progression plot monitoring and plotless evaluation of Phytophthora ramorum incidence in different forest types in coastal California. R. B. Standiford, Center for Forestry, UC Berkeley; N. M. Kelly, Ecosystem Science, UC Berkeley.

Urban Systems
Quantifying the risk of pitch canker to susceptible pines in California. T. R. Gordon, Plant Pathology, UC Davis.

Exotic/Invasive Pests and Diseases Panels 2004-2007

Program Advisory Committee
Ted Batkin
, Citrus Research Board; Cato Fiksdal, Los Angeles Co. Ag. Commissioner; Linda Fisher, Legislative Aide to Congressman Ken Calvert, U.S. House of Representatives; Dennis Mayhew, CDFA Plant Health and Pest Prevention Services; Harvey Logan, Pest Control Operators of California; John Randall, The Nature Conservancy Invasive Program, UC Davis; Jake Sigg, California Native Plants Society; Rick Standiford, Ecosystem Sciences, UC Berkeley; Helene Wright, USDA-APHIS

Technical Advisory Committee
John Battles
, Environmental Science, Policy and Management, UC Berkeley; David Kellum, San Diego Co. Dept. of Agriculture; John Klotz, Entomology, UC Riverside; Michael Pitcairn, CDFA; John Trumble, Entomology, UC Riverside; Robert Webster, Plant Pathology, UC Davis; Herb Bolton, USDA, Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service; Richard Bostock, Plant Pathology, UC Davis; Rick Melnicoe, USDA Western IPM Center, UC Davis; Joe Morse, ANR Agricultural Policy and Pest Management, UC Riverside; Tim Paine, Entomology, UC Riverside; Rick Roush, UC IPM Program, UC Davis

Agricultural Systems Scientific Advisory Panel
John Trumble (Co-Chair); Rick Redak, Entomology, UC Riverside (Co-Chair); John Blasius, CDFA; Pete Goodell, UC IPM Program, Kearney Agricultural Center, Parlier; Tom Gordon, Plant Pathology, UC Davis; Jodie Holt, Botany and Plant Sciences, UC Riverside; Marshall Johnson, Kearney Agricultural Center, Parlier

Natural Systems Scientific Advisory Panel
John Battles (Co-Chair), Environmental Science, Policy and Management; Michael Pitcairn (Co-Chair), Biological Control Program, CDFA; Gordon Frankie, Insect Biology, UC Berkeley; Ted Grosholz, Environmental Science and Policy, UC Davis; Lincoln Smith, USDA Aquatic Weed Research, Western Regional Research Center; David Spencer, USDA Aquatic Weed Research, UC Davis

Urban Systems Scientific Advisory Panel
David Kellum (Co-Chair), San Diego Co. Dept. of Agriculture; John Klotz (Co-Chair), Entomology, UC Riverside; Larry Bezark, CDFA; Pamela Geisel, UC Coop. Ext. Fresno Co.; Tom Lanini, Vegetable Crops, UC Davis; Marco Metzger, California Dept. of Health Services, Vector-Borne Disease; Krishna Subbarao, Plant Pathology, UC Davis; Bob Van Steenwyk, Insect Biology, UC Berkeley

Researchers Perform Experiments to Protect Songbirds from Black Rats

Songbirds are singing again in Cosumnes River Preserve thanks to the efforts of scientists from UC Davis.

Nearly four years ago, in one of the Central Valley’s richest birding locations, songbirds were struggling to protect their eggs from rats. In April 2001, before the nesting season began, Desley Whisson, a University of California Cooperative Extension vertebrate pest ecologist, and Andy Engilis, museum curator at UC Davis, armed themselves with phony nests and cameras with infrared sensors to track down the rodents. They studied their impact on the songbirds and how to manage them.

Birds that build deep “cavity” nests seem to survive, but birds like song sparrows that build shallow “open cup” nests were being pillaged by the non-native black rat (Rattus rattus). No one is quite sure when black rats became established in California, but they are now widespread in urban areas. This study is among the first to investigate their impacts on songbirds in California’s native habitats.

In research funded by the UC IPM Exotic Pests Program, Bureau of Land Management, and the Selma Herr Fund for Ornithology, Desley and Andy placed nests with remote cameras in three geographically separate riparian forest tracts — the Tall Forest, Orr Ranch (both at the Cosumnes River Preserve), Bobelaine Sanctuary (on the Feather River), and the Kern River Preserve. Black rat densities in these forests were found to be much higher than anticipated and were reducing the densities of native small mammals. Black rats were not found at the Kern River Preserve.

The researchers trapped several rats, fitted some with telemetry devices to track their movements and map territories, and brought others into the lab to test the effectiveness of baits and poisons that could be used to control their numbers. After experimenting with several baits they determined the most effective was chlorophacinone. The bait was then field tested using bait stations that limited access by other native animals.

During most of 2003 and 2004, they implemented their management strategy in one forest tract in the Cosumnes River Preserve. Rats readily consumed bait from bait stations throughout the forest, which meant that the rat population was low during the songbird nesting season.

“From our trapping evidence, the field trials were successful in lowering black rat populations, but we must examine nesting data from 2004 and 2005 to determine if nesting success improves,” says Andy.

Research schedules

UC IPM Research Schedule, 2005 (updated)
Jan. 5, 2005 Progress reports due for all projects funded in 2004-2005
Jan. 27, 2005 Final reports due for all projects that ended June 2004
Feb. 15, 2005 Request for proposals distributed
April 4, 2005 Proposals due
Spring 2005 Technical Committee meets in Davis to review proposals
May 2005 Final funding decisions made and principal investigators notified
July 1, 2005 Funding for 2005-2006 begins
Aug. 9, 2005 Copy of the University June Final 2005 ledger due for each project
Exotic/Invasive Pests and Diseases Research Schedule, 2005 (updated)
April 15, 2005 Proposals due
April 20, 2005 Progress reports due
April 20, 2005 Final reports due
June 2005 Advisory committees meet
October 2005 Research workshop
Next article

Top of page


Statewide IPM Program, Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California
All contents copyright © 2005 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.

For noncommercial purposes only, any Web site may link directly to this page. FOR ALL OTHER USES or more information, read Legal Notices. Unfortunately, we cannot provide individual solutions to specific pest problems. See our Home page, or in the U.S., contact your local Cooperative Extension office for assistance.

Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California

Accessibility   /IPMPROJECT/2004/04competitivegrants.html revised: March 7, 2005. Contact webmaster.