Cherry

Year-Round IPM Program for Cherry

(Reviewed: 11/09, Updated 3/13)

These practices are recommended for a monitoring-based IPM program that enhances pest control and reduces environmental quality problems related to pesticide use.

Water quality becomes impaired when pesticides and sediments move off-site and into water. Air quality becomes impaired when volatile organic compounds (VOCs) move into the atmosphere. Each time a pesticide application is considered, review the Pesticide Application Checklist at the bottom of this page for information on how to minimize air and water quality problems.

This year-round IPM program covers the major pests of cherry. Details on carrying out each practice, example monitoring forms, and information on additional pests can be found in the Cherry Pest Management Guidelines. Track your progress through the year using this annual checklist form.

Dormancy: leaf fall to bud swell (December–February)

Mitigate pesticide effects on air and water quality.
What should you be doing at this time?
Survey weeds and check for weeds that escaped fall herbicide treatments.
  • Record results (PDF).
  • Adjust herbicides and/or timing accordingly for future treatments.
Apply a dormant or delayed-dormant spray according to the Cherry Pest Management Guidelines if the orchard has a history of these problems, or if monitoring indicates a need:
Keep area around base of trees free of vegetation to reduce problems with rodents.
Other pests you may see:

Bloom: pink bud to petal fall (March–early April)

Mitigate pesticide effects on air and water quality.
What should you be doing at this time?
Look for these pests and their damage. Treat, if needed, according to Cherry Pest Management Guidelines:
  • Caterpillars
  • Earwigs
  • Black cherry aphid
  • Western flower thrips
Treat when orchard history or weather conditions indicates a need for:
Other pests you may see:

Fruit development: petal fall to fruit coloring (April–May)

Mitigate pesticide effects on air and water quality.
What should you be doing at this time?

Look for these pests and treat, if needed, according to the Cherry Pest Management Guidelines:

  • Black cherry aphids
  • Caterpillars
  • Earwigs
  • Peachtree borer
  • Western flower thrips
  • Armillaria root rot
  • Bacterial canker
  • Powdery mildew
  • Brown rot and Botrytis infections on fruit
  • Gophers
  • Phytophthora root and crown rot
Monitor mites by watching "hot spots" and examining water sprouts for developing infestations.
Survey weeds in late spring or early summer after summer annuals have germinated.
  • Record observations (PDF).
  • Control with cultivation or postemergence herbicides.
  • Keep areas around the base of trees free of vegetation to reduce problems from peachtree borer.

Preharvest through harvest: fruit coloring through harvest (May–June)

Mitigate pesticide effects on air and water quality.
What should you be doing at this time?
Treat for brown rot, Botrytis fruit rot, or powdery mildew if preharvest conditions indicate a need.
Examine trees and fruit for X-disease (cherry buckskin) symptoms.
  • Mark any infected trees (plan to remove them after a postharvest leafhopper spray).

Evaluate previous treatments by examining trees for:

Continue to monitor mites by watching "hot spots" and examining water sprouts for developing infestations.
Beginlooking for birds and start deterrent management practices before they begin to feed.
Sample fruit at harvest to determine the effectiveness of your pest management program.
Other pests you may see:

Postharvest (June–November)

Mitigate pesticide effects on air and water quality.
What should you be doing at this time?
Continue monitoring and treat if needed according to the Cherry Pest Management Guidelines for:
Examine any declining trees to determine the cause. Manage according to Cherry Pest Management Guidelines.
Treat for leafhopper (cherry and mountain) vectors of X-disease (Cherry buckskin) from June through October if disease has been found in (or near) the orchard.
  • Remove any infected trees as soon as possible after a leafhopper spray.
Collect leaf samples for nutrient analysis June through July.
Prune out wood and promptly destroy brush piles before September to help manage these pests:
Continue to manage weeds in the orchard:
  • Control summer perennials such as field bindweed, bermudagrass, and johnsongrass.
  • Apply preemergence spray in fall based on weed surveys (combine with postemergence if needed), targeting dandelion, clovers, and curly dock to limit X-disease.
  • Keep tree bases free of vegetation to reduce problems with rodents in winter and peachtree borer in summer.
Seed cover crop in October – avoid using cloversthat can host the X-disease pathogen and leafhopper vectors: Berseem, crimson, rose, subterranean, and sweet clovers.
Other pests you may see:

Pesticide application checklist

When planning for possible pesticide applications in an IPM program, review and complete this checklist to consider practices that minimize environmental and efficacy problems.

PDF: To display a PDF document, you may need to use a PDF reader.

Top of page


Statewide IPM Program, Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California
All contents copyright © 2014 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.

For noncommercial purposes only, any Web site may link directly to this page. FOR ALL OTHER USES or more information, read Legal Notices. Unfortunately, we cannot provide individual solutions to specific pest problems. See our Home page, or in the U.S., contact your local Cooperative Extension office for assistance.

Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California

Accessibility   /PMG/C105/m105yi01.html revised: January 8, 2014. Contact webmaster.