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Citrus

Citricola Scale and Brown Soft Scale

Names link to more information on identification and management.

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Citricola scale
Citricola scale females
Citricola scale females
Identification tip: During spring, citricola scales mature into females, which are mottled brown to gray. Except for late-maturing second-instars on twigs or leaves, the entire population is females on twigs.

Citricola scale first-instars
Citricola scale first instars
Identification tip: During summer, all citricola scales are first instars. These nymphs are translucent orange to brownish and occur on leaves, often along veins.

Citricola scale second-instars
Citricola scale second instars
Identification tip: Nymphs enlarge and become mottled dark brown in late summer and fall when they begin to move from leaves to bark, where they overwinter.

Brown soft scale

Brown soft scale mixed instars
Brown soft scale mixed instars
Identification tip: Brown soft scale is the only soft scale on citrus with multiple generations a year which overlap. Different-sized scales occurring together helps to distinguish this species.

Brown soft scale nymphs
Brown soft scale nymphs
Identification tip: Some stages resemble citricola scale, but unlike citricola, brown soft scales are rarely colored gray. Most of these scales have round holes left by emerging parasites.

Brown soft scale nymphs
Brown soft scale nymphs
Identification tip: Brown soft scale is under excellent biological control unless natural enemies are disrupted. Within any colony, many individual scales are usually discolored or dark because of parasitism.

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