How to Manage Pests

Pests in Gardens and Landscapes

Seasonal development and life cycle—Shot hole

The fungus that causes shot hole survives the dormant season inside infected buds and in twig lesions. The spores produced on lesions can remain alive for several months. They are spread by splashing rain or irrigation water. Spores that land on twigs, buds, blossoms, or young leaves require 24 hours of continuous wetness to cause infection. Only the current season's growth is susceptible to infection. In California, twig and bud infections of apricot, nectarine, and peach can occur during rainy weather any time between fall and spring. The fungus can germinate and infect at temperatures as low as 36° F.

Shot hole overwinters in twig lesions
Shot hole overwinters in twig lesions

Statewide IPM Program, Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California
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