How to Manage Pests

Pests in Gardens and Landscapes

Brown rot—Monilinia spp.

Blossoms on plants infected with Monilinia brown and wither. Dead blossoms often cling to twigs for a long time. Sunken, brown areas may develop around twigs at the base of infected flowers, causing leaves at the tips of twigs to shrivel up. Brown, sticky droplets of gum may exude from the base of dead flowers and the bark of infected twigs. Velvety gray or tan tufts of spores are formed on diseased blossoms or twig cankers. Brown or tan spots spread rapidly over the fruit surface and produce spores.

Life cycle

Solutions

Prompt removal and destruction of fruit mummies and diseased plant parts prevents the buildup of brown rot inoculum and helps keep rot below damaging levels. Prune trees to allow good ventilation. Furrow irrigate or use low-angle sprinklers to avoid wetting blossoms, foliage, and fruit. Plant varieties that are least susceptible; check with your local nurseryman. If you have had problems in the past, applications of copper-containing fungicides or synthetic fungicides such as myclobutanil at pink bud stage can help avoid serious losses. Additional applications when fruit starts to color may be needed if rainy weather persists. Do not apply copper compounds after bloom.

Infected shoots
Infected shoots
Droplets of gum
Droplets of gum
Brown rot on peach
Brown rot on peach
Spores on prune
Spores on prune

Statewide IPM Program, Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California
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Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California

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