How to Manage Pests

Pests in Gardens and Landscapes

Natural enemies

An egg parasite, Anagrus epos, is commonly present during part of the season in many vineyards, especially vines adjacent to prune, plum, or almond trees. After a leafhopper egg is parasitized, it becomes visibly red. Unfortunately, this parasite is not as effective on variegated leafhopper eggs as it is on those of the grape leafhopper.

The large predaceous mite, Anystis agilis, attacks grape leafhopper nymphs. Other predators of leafhoppers include green lacewings, minute pirate bugs, lady beetles, bigeyed bugs, and spiders.

Anystis agilis
Anystis agilis
Anagrus  female
Anagrus
female
Reddening of egg
Reddening of egg
Parasitized egg
Parasitized egg

Statewide IPM Program, Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California
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