How to Manage Pests

Pests in Gardens and Landscapes

Pest identification and confirmation—Common leaf spot diseases

Fungal scab
Fungal scab
Olive green to black, circular, scabby or velvety spots appear on infected leaves, which may yellow or redden and drop prematurely. Occurs on many hosts.

Anthracnose
Anthracnose
Anthracnose causes small spots on oaks and walnuts and larger spots on elm, ash, birch, and redbud. Large angular areas occur on maple and sycamore.

Entomosporium
Entomosporium

Tiny reddish spots, sometimes surrounded by a yellow halo, appear on leaves of infected plants. Spots darken and enlarge as the leaves mature. Cream-colored specks with a glossy membrane eventually appear in the center of the spots. Affects rose family plants, including pome fruits.

Shothole
Shot hole
Reddish, purplish, or brown spots appear on new buds, leaves, and shoots. Spots expand and centers turn brown. Small dark specks form in the brown centers. These help distinguish shot hole from other diseases. Affects Prunus spp.

Septoria
Septoria
Round, angular, flecked, sunken, or irregular spots appear on mostly older leaves. Affects Populus spp., azaleas, and hebe.


Statewide IPM Program, Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California
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