How to Manage Pests

Pests in Gardens and Landscapes

Pest identification and confirmation—Juniper twig girdler

Don't confuse twig girdler damage with that caused by disease or other insects such as cypress tip miner or juniper scales. Look for off-white larvae with brown heads, up to 0.38 inches long and tunnels under twig bark to confirm the presence of twig girdlers. Dying juniper branches may also be caused by mice or root rot fungi. Bark chewed away in bands from lower parts of branches is symptomatic of rodent feeding. If you don't find insect damage or rodent chewing, the dieback may be caused by soil fungi, which thrive when soil moisture is high for prolonged periods. Twig dieback at the edges of plantings may be the result of dog urine, which can be diagnosed by the characteristic odor.

 

Silvery tan adult cypress tip miner
Silvery tan adult cypress tip miner

Browning of juniper caused by tip miner
Browning of juniper caused by tip miner


Statewide IPM Program, Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California
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