How to Manage Pests

Pests in Gardens and Landscapes

Seasonal development and life cycle—Flea beetles

Adult flea beetles overwinter in weeds or debris and fly into potato-growing areas in spring. Flea beetles lay very small eggs in the soil around the plant, on the leaves, or in cavities hollowed out in the stems. The larvae are small, slender, white, and wormlike and usually attack the roots but may also feed on foliage. Depending on the species, they rarely cause significant damage except on potato tubers, where they create tunnels in the flesh of tubers. The larval stage may last up to a month. Flea beetles pupate in the soil. There are one or two generations a year.

Tuber flea beetle larva
Tuber flea beetle larva
Flea beetle adult
Flea beetle adult
Flea beetle pupa
Flea beetle pupa

Statewide IPM Program, Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California
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