UC IPM Online UC ANR home page UC IPM home page

UC IPM Home

SKIP navigation

 

How to Manage Pests

UC Pest Management Guidelines


Whitish patches on the undersides of leaves are a symptom of powdery mildew.

Apple

Powdery Mildew

Pathogen: Podosphaera leucotricha

(Reviewed 8/06, updated 3/09)

In this Guideline:


SYMPTOMS AND SIGNS

Powdery mildew is distinguished by superficial, white powdery growth on leaves and shoots that results in the stunting and distortion of young growth. Infected fruit are stunted and russetted, and fruit set may be reduced.

COMMENTS ON THE DISEASE

This is a major foliage disease of apples. The fungus overwinters in terminal buds that are white, flattened, and pointed. Disease development is favored by warm days and cool, moist nights.

MANAGEMENT

Powdery mildew is managed primarily by pruning infected shoots during dormancy or in early spring and by applying sprays as necessary in spring to prevent buildup of the fungus and damage to the crop. Remove infected shoot tips at pruning. Chemical control of powdery mildew is done in conjunction with controls for scab. Timing and choice of material may vary from orchard to orchard.

Organically Acceptable Methods
Pruning and treatments with lime and sulfur, sulfur alone, or certain horticultural oils can be used to treat organically certified produce.

Treatment Decisions
Preferred timing is an application at pink bud. If powdery mildew continues to be a problem in the orchard, apply additional treatments until terminal growth ceases.

Common name   R.E.I.+ P.H.I.+

(trade name)

Amount to Use

(hours)

(days)


  Calculate impact of pesticide on air quality
The following materials are listed in order of usefulness in an IPM program, taking into account efficacy. When choosing a pesticide, also consider information relating to environmental quality. Not all registered pesticides are listed. Always read label of product being used.
 
A. TRIFLOXYSTROBIN
  (Flint) 2–2.5 oz/acre 12 14
  MODE OF ACTION GROUP NAME (NUMBER1): Quinone outside inhibitor (11)
  COMMENTS: Do not apply more than 2 consecutive applications before alternating. Do not apply more than 11 oz/acre/season.
   
B. FENARIMOL
  (Rubigan) 1EC 9–12 oz/acre 12 30
  MODE OF ACTION GROUP NAME (NUMBER1): Demethylation inhibitor (3)
  COMMENTS: Do not apply more than 84 fl oz/acre/season.
       
C. MYCLOBUTANIL
  (Rally) 40WP 1.25–2.5 oz/100 gal water/acre 24 14
  MODE OF ACTION GROUP NAME (NUMBER1): Demethylation inhibitor (3)
  COMMENTS: Apply 400 gal/acre. Continue applications through the second cover spray at 7- to 10-day intervals. Use high label rate if disease was present in previous years. For application by ground equipment only.
   
D. TRIFLUMIZOLE
  (Procure) 50WS 8–16 oz/acre 12 14
  MODE OF ACTION GROUP NAME (NUMBER1): Demethylation inhibitor (3)
   
       
E. MICRONIZED SULFUR# 10–20 lb/acre 24 0
  MODE OF ACTION GROUP NAME (NUMBER1): Multi-site contact (M2)
  COMMENTS: May be used after bloom. Some russetting may occur in sensitive varieties if temperatures exceed 80°F.
         
F. LIQUID LIME SULFUR# 2 gal/100 gal dilute spray 48 0
  . . . PLUS . . .
  WETTABLE SULFUR# 4–5 lb/100 gal 24 0
  MODE OF ACTION GROUP NAME (NUMBER1): Multi-site contact (M2)
  COMMENTS: Do not use after bloom begins. Lime sulfur is incompatible with most other pesticides. Check before use.
   
G. TRIADIMEFON
(Bayleton) 50DF 2–8 oz/acre 12 45
  MODE OF ACTION GROUP NAME (NUMBER1): Demethylation inhibitor (3)
COMMENTS: Do not apply more than 24 oz/acre/season. Do not graze livestock in treated orchards.
 
H. THIOPHANATE METHYL    
  (Topsin-M) 70WP 1–1.5 lb/acre 12 0
  MODE OF ACTION GROUP NAME (NUMBER1): Methyl benzimidazole (1)
  COMMENTS: Resistance to thiophanate methyl may develop if this material is used repeatedly. It is important to alternate this material with materials of a different chemistry. Do not apply more than 4 lb product/season.
   
I. LIQUID LIME SULFUR# 2–3 gal/100 gal dilute 48 0
  MODE OF ACTION GROUP NAME (NUMBER1): Multi-site contact (M2)
  COMMENTS: Lime sulfur is incompatible with most other pesticides. Check before use. An in-season application eradicates powdery mildew.
   
J. HORTICULTURAL OIL#    
  (Organic JMS Stylet Oil) 1–2 gal 4 0
  MODE OF ACTION: Unknown
  COMMENTS: Use higher rate and/or shorter spray interval when disease conditions are severe. Check with your certifier to determine other appropriate oils to use on an organically certified crop.
   
+ Restricted entry interval (R.E.I.) is the number of hours (unless otherwise noted) from treatment until the treated area can be safely entered without protective clothing. Preharvest interval (P.H.I.) is the number of days from treatment to harvest. In some cases the REI exceeds the PHI. The longer of two intervals is the minimum time that must elapse before harvest.
# Acceptable for use on organically grown produce.
1 Group numbers are assigned by the Fungicide Resistance Action Committee (FRAC) according to different modes of actions (for more information, see http://www.frac.info/). Fungicides with a different group number are suitable to alternate in a resistance management program. In California, make no more than one application of fungicides with mode of action Group numbers 1,4,9,11, or 17 before rotating to a fungicide with a different mode of action Group number; for fungicides with other Group numbers, make no more than two consecutive applications before rotating to fungicide with a different mode of action Group number.

[Precautions]

PUBLICATION

[UC Peer Reviewed]

UC IPM Pest Management Guidelines: Apple
UC ANR Publication 3432
Diseases
W. D. Gubler, Plant Pathology, UC Davis
Acknowledgment for contributions to Diseases:
B. L. Teviotdale, Kearney Agricultural Center, Parlier

Top of page


Statewide IPM Program, Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California
All contents copyright © 2014 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.

For noncommercial purposes only, any Web site may link directly to this page. FOR ALL OTHER USES or more information, read Legal Notices. Unfortunately, we cannot provide individual solutions to specific pest problems. See our Home page, or in the U.S., contact your local Cooperative Extension office for assistance.

Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California

Accessibility   /PMG/r4100311.html revised: January 8, 2014. Contact webmaster.