Apricot

Agricultural pest management


Susceptibility of Weeds to Herbicide Control

(Reviewed 10/14, updated 10/14)

In this Guideline: More about weeds in apricot:

Susceptibility of Winter Weeds to Herbicide Control
Customize LIST OF WEEDS FLM IND ISO NAP NOR ORY OXY PEN PRO RIM TRI CAR CLE CLO DLI FLU GLY OXY PAR* PYR SET 24D*
Mode of Action1 14 29 21 15 12 3 14 3 3 2 3 14 1 1 9 14 22 14 1 4
ANNUAL WEEDS
barley, hare P C N C C C P C C P C N C P P C C P P N C N
bluegrass, annual C C N C C C P C C C C N C P P N C P P N N N
brome, downy P C N C C C N C C C C N C P P P C N P N P N
brome, ripgut P C N C C C C C C C N C P P P C N P N C N
burclover, California P P N N C P N N N C P P N N
canarygrass P N C C C P C C C N C P P C C P P C N
chickweed, common C P C C P C N C C C P N C C N C N C P N P
clovers, perennial C P P N N P N N N N N N N P P P C N P
cudweeds C C P C C N N N N C N N P P N C P N P N P
fiddlenecks C C C C C C C C C C C C N P P N C C C P N P
filarees C C C C P N C N N C P N P P P P C P C N P
groundsel, common C P C C P N C N N C N N P P N C C C C N P
henbit C C C N P P C C C C N P P N C C C C N P
lettuce, miner's C C C C C P C C N C C N C C P N N
mallow, little C C P P P P C N P C N C N P P N P C N C N N
mustards C C C P P N C N C C N P N C C N C P C C N C
nettle, burning C C C P C P C C P P C N P P N N P P N N P
oat, wild C C N C P P P P P C P N C P P C C N P P C N
pineapple-weed C C P N C N N N N N P P N C P P N N N
polypogon, rabbitfoot C N C C N C C N C N N C C P C C N
radish, wild C C C N P N C N P C N P N P P N C P P C N C
redmaids (desert rockpurslane) C C C C C C C C P N P P N C C C C N C
rocket, London C C C C P N C N C C N C N C C N C C C N N C
ryegrasses P C N C C C N C C C C N C N N C C2 N P P C N
shepherd's–purse C C C P P N C C C C N P N C C N C P C C N C
C= control    P= partial control    N= no control    = no information
Herbicide Mode of Action1 Herbicide Mode of Action1
CAR = carfentrazone (Shark EW) 14 ORY = oryzalin (Surflan) 3
CLE = clethodim (SelectMax) 1 OXY = oxyfluorfen (GoalTender) 14
CLO = clove oil (Matran II, Burnout II) PAR = paraquat* (Gramoxone Inteon) 22
DLI = d-limonene (Avenger) PEN = pendimethalin (Prowl H2O) 3
FLM = flumioxazin (Chateau SW) 14 PRO = pronamide (Kerb) 3
FLU = fluazifop-p-butyl (Fusilade DX) 1 PYR = pyraflufen (Venue) 14
GLY = glyphosate (Roundup) 9 RIM = rimsulfuron (Matrix SG) 2
IND = indaziflam (Alion) 29 SET = sethoxydim (Poast) 1
ISO = isoxaben (Gallery) 21 TRI = trifluralin (Treflan) 3
NAP = napropamide (Devrinol) 15 2,4-D = 2,4-D* (Saber) 4
NOR = norflurazon (Solicam) 12    
 
*Permit required from county agricultural commissioner for purchase or use.
1Group numbers are assigned by the Weed Science Society of America (WSSA) according to different modes of action. Although weeds may exhibit multiple resistance across many groups, mode of action numbers are useful in planning mixtures or rotations of herbicides with different modes of action. For more information, see http://www.hracglobal.com.
2Some populations in California are known to be resistant.
Susceptibility of Spring and Summer Weeds to Herbicide Control
Customize LIST OF WEEDS Postemergence  
FLM IND ISO NAP NOR ORY OXY PEN PRO RIM TRI CAR CLE CLO DLI FLU GLY OXY PAR* PYR SET 24D*
Mode of Action1 14 29 21 15 12 3 14 3 3 2 3 14 1 1 9 14 22 14 1 4
ANNUAL WEEDS
barnyardgrass C C N C P C P C C C C N C P P P C N P N C N
chickweed, common C C C C P C N N C C P C N C C N C N C C N N
cocklebur P C C N C N N P N P N N C C C C N C
crabgrasses C C N C P C N C C C C N C N N C C P C N C N
cudweeds C C P C C N N N N N N N P P N C P N C N P
fleabane, hairy P C P N P N P N N C N N N N N N C P P P N P
foxtails C C N C C C N C C C C C P P C C N C N C N
filarees C C C C P N C N N C P C N P P P P C P P N P
goosefoot, nettleleaf C C C C C C C P C P C N N N N C P C C N C
goosegrass C N C C N C C C N C N N C C N P N
groundcherry C C C N C P C N C C N C N C C N C C C C N C
horseweed C C P N P N P N N C N N N N N N C P P P N C
junglerice C C N C C C P C P C C N C P P P C N P N C N
knotweed, oval-leaf P C C P C P C C C C N N N N P P C C N P
lambsquarters, common C C C C P C C C C C C C N P P N C C C C N C
lettuce, prickly P P C C P N C N N C N P N N N N C C P C N C
lovegrass C C N C P C P C C P C N C N N C C N P N C N
nightshades C C C N C N C N C C N P N C C N C C C C N C
pigweeds C C C C P C C C N C C C N C C N C C C C N P
puncturevine C P N C P C C N C P N P P N C P C P N C
purslane, common C C C C P C C C C C C P N N N N P C C C N C
sandburs C N C P C N C C N C N N P C N P N P N
sowthistles P C C C P N C N P P N N N C C N C C P C N C
sprangletops P C N C P C N C C P N C P P P C P P N P N
spurge, spotted C C N P P P C P C N N C C N C N C C N C
starthistle, yellow C N C N N P N N N N N N C N C P N C
thistle, Russian C C P C C P P P P P P C N N N N C P C C N P
willowherb, tall annual P C P N P P C N N N N P N N P N C
witchgrass P N C P C C C C N C P P C C N N N C N
PERENNIAL WEEDS
bermudagrass (Se) N N C C C N C N N N N C P P C C N P N C N
bermudagrass (Pr) N N N N P N N N N N N N P N N P P N N N P N
bindweed, field N P N N N N N N N P N P N P P N P N N P N P
blackberries, wild N N N N N N N N N N N C N N N N P
dallisgrass (Se) N C N C N C C N C N C N N C C N N N C N
dallisgrass (Pr) N N N N N N N N N N N N P N N P P N N N P N
dandelion (Se) P C N P N N N N N N N N C N P N C
dandelion (Pr) N N N N N N N N N N N N N N P N N N C
dock, curly N N N N N N N N N N P N N N P
fescue, tall P P N C C P C P C N P P P P C N P N P N
fluvellins N N N P N
johnsongrass (Se) C C N C C C N C C P C N C N N C C N C N C N
johnsongrass (Pr) N N N N P N N N N N N N P N N P P N N N P N
nutsedge, yellow N N N N P N N N N P N N N N N N P N N N N N
nutsedge, purple N N N N P N N N N P N N N N N N P N N N N N
oxalis N C N P C P P N N N N C P N P
plantain, buckhorn (Se) P N N N N N C C N C
plantain, buckhorn (Pr) N P N N N N N N N N N N N N P N N N P
C= control    P= partial control    N= no control    = no information
Herbicide Mode of Action1 Herbicide Mode of Action1
CAR = carfentrazone (Shark EW) 14 ORY = oryzalin (Surflan) 3
CLE = clethodim (SelectMax) 1 OXY = oxyfluorfen (GoalTender) 14
CLO = clove oil (Matran II, BurnOut II) PAR = paraquat* (Gramoxone Inteon) 22
DLI = d-limonene (Avenger) PEN = pendimethalin (Prowl H2O) 3
FLM = flumioxazin (Chateau SW) 14 PYR = pyraflufen (Venue) 14
FLU = fluazifop-p-butyl (Fusilade) 1 PRO = pronamide (Kerb) 3
GLY = glyphosate (Roundup) 9 RIM = rimsulfuron (Matrix SG) 2
IND = indaziflam (Alion) 29 SET = sethoxydim (Poast) 1
ISO = isoxaben (Gallery) 21 TRI = trifluralin (Treflan) 3
NAP = napropamide (Devrinol) 15 2,4-D = 2,4-D* (Orchard Master) 4
NOR = norflurazon (Solicam) 12    
 
*Permit required from county agricultural commissioner for purchase or use.
1Group numbers are assigned by the Weed Science Society of America (WSSA) according to different modes of action. Although weeds may exhibit multiple resistance across many groups, mode of action numbers are useful in planning mixtures or rotations of herbicides with different modes of action. For more information, see http://www.hracglobal.com.

[Precautions]

PUBLICATION

[UC Peer Reviewed]

UC IPM Pest Management Guidelines: Apricot
UC ANR Publication 3433

Weeds

K. J. Hembree, UC Cooperative Extension, Fresno County

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