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How to Manage Pests

The UC Guide to Healthy Lawns

Turf species

Often, turfgrass problems occur because the grass species is not compatible with your climate or amount of wear your lawn gets.

What are you currently growing? Use the turfgrass key to help you identify your grass species.

Use the table on the right to help you find a turfgrass species best adapted to your conditions.

Turf species best adapted to most California conditions*
Turf species
Tolerance
Season
Heat
Cold
Drought
Shade
Salinity
Wear/
Traffic
Bermudagrass
High
Low
High
Low
High
High
Warm
Kentucky bluegrass
Low
High
Low
Mod
Low
Mod
Cool
Perennial ryegrass
Low
High
Low
Low
Mod
High
Cool
Red fescue
Low
High
Mod
High
Low
Mod
Cool
St. Augustinegrass
High
Low
Mod
High
High
Mod
Warm
Tall fescue
Mod-high
Mod
Mod
Mod
Mod
High
Cool

Mod = Moderate

*Most lawns are planted as a mixture of species to increase their tolerance to various factors.

Keep in mind that cool-season grasses can appear washed-out or yellowish in the summer and warm-season grasses may turn brown in the winter. It is normal for these grasses to change colors when they are not actively growing and are dormant.


Statewide IPM Program, Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California
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For noncommercial purposes only, any Web site may link directly to this page. FOR ALL OTHER USES or more information, read Legal Notices. Unfortunately, we cannot provide individual solutions to specific pest problems. See our Home page, or in the U.S., contact your local Cooperative Extension office for assistance.

Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California

Accessibility   /TOOLS/TURF/PESTS/diagturf.html revised: July 10, 2014. Contact webmaster.